News
Les Twentyman for 2018 Literary Festival
Les Twentyman will be presenting this yeat at the Coal Creek Literary Festival. One of Australia's best known outreach workers, Les will be promoting his book " The Mouth That Roared"
2015 News

Successful literary festival
AUTHORS and bookworms alike descended on Coal Creek for the eighth annual Literary Festival last week.
Guests were granted the opportunity to listen to authors from different literary genres discuss their writing and publishing experiences in a series of exclusive panel interviews and discussions across the day.
Literary Festival committee member Rowena Ashley said the event was a tremendous success.
“All of the sessions had a high number of attendances which was surprisingly higher than last year,” Ms Ashley said.
“We had representatives from three book clubs in Warragul who were really impressed by the event and have said they will support us next year.”
“The presenters were happy and all had good book sales throughout the day while entries into our writing competitions were up 50 per cent,” Ms Ashley said.
The $500 prestigious Bert van Bedaf Memorial Prize was won this year by Nicole Michelle for her entry Gone Troppo ahead of over 40 entries.
The under 18 picture book competition was won by Archie Creek’s Kate Fisher for her story titled New Girl.
The Literary Festival attracted authors and readers from across South Gippsland with an audience full of guests from Waragul, Toora, Leongatha, Mirboo North and beyond.
The open poetry competition saw entries from across Australia compete for the award, won by Queensland writer Emily Cotral’s Sea Shanty.
The Literary Festival will continue to flourish with authors already booked in for the 2016 event.
Acclaimed author Honey Brown said the event has always, and will continue to be, a success.
“I am a veteran of this event now. I think this is my fourth or fifth year and I absolutely love coming here,” Ms Brown said.
Fellow author Nicole Hayes said the committee’s organisation of the festival ensured a great experience for both guest speakers and audience members.
“David and the committee have organised a great program and have been great at communicating and planning the day,” Ms Hayes said. Ms Brown agreed.
“It has been a great opportunity for us to connect with the audiences and with each other. We have all made friends from these events,” Ms Brown said.


Article by Lucy Johnson as published in The Star Newspaper October 6th 2015

ASPIRING novelists and book worms received plenty of inspiration at Coal Creek’s eighth annual Literary Festival on Saturday.
Whilst most people were glued to screens at Grand Final festivities around the region, a dedicated bunch of avid readers gathered in Coal Creek’s auditorium to hear invaluable insight into the world of publishing from no less than nine guest authors.
One particularly illuminating panel came early in the day, with Sandi Wallace and Nicole Hayes – two Melbourne novelists with recent releases both set in contemporary Victoria – discussing everything from character development through to print runs.
Wallace’s debut crime epic, ‘Tell Me Why’, has impressed even the most critical crime prose buffs since it was released last year.
On Saturday, the writer revealed the extent of her research into the small country town where her story is set.
“I would go to the Daylesford police station and sit there talking to an officer,” she told the audience.
“I’d then imagine the characters walking around that station.”
Hayes, a writing tutor whose sophomore effort, ‘One True Thing’, deals with politics and music in contemporary Melbourne, agreed that strong writing surfaces when “you let the characters tell the story.”
“When your characters start to feel real and you feel like you’re living inside of them, that’s when the writing becomes really good,” she mused.
Hayes also had some sound advice for those present who were still tinkering with their first crack at a novel.
“My approach has been to write it wrong first and then go back to it,” she laughed.
“I rewrote my first novel 20 times over 15 years.
“And even that is probably an understatement.”
And although she may be judged as already having ‘made it’ as a writer - having two books under her belt and a deal with Random House – Hayes says her dream of seeing one of her books read by random stranger in a public place still eludes her.
“I’d like to see someone reading one of my books somewhere, unprompted,” she confessed,
“I’ve seen them on sale in shops, but I’m still waiting to see one ‘in the wild’.”
Other guest authors at the event included David Tattersall, Honey Brown, Carrie Maya, Jacqueline Dinan, Sandy Jeffs and Hao Pham.

Article By Gav Ross as printed in the South Gippsland Sentinel Times

Nichole Hayes, "One True Thing" is the Book Club book for August in ABC's Rapgael Epstein's Book Club

Follow link below for more information

Raphael Epstein Book Club

Short Story Award Continues with $500 Prize

The Coal Creek Literary Festival will be running a number of writing competitions this year as part of this year's  festival. The main competition will again be the Bert van Bedaf Memorial Award for the best short story. Bert was an integral part of getting the Coal Creek Literary Festival off the ground 9 years ago. After Bert passed away in 2010, the open short story competition was renamed to honour his memory. The prize money was increased to $500 and has since drawn a very high standard of entries.
Past winning entries have been posted on the Coal Creek Literary Festival web site at http://www.coalcreekliteraryfestival.com/ . The competition is open to anyone with an imagination, a pen and paper or word processing program. You can enter as many times as you like, each entry must have a $15 entry fee.
The festival will also be running an Open Poetry competition. The Open Poetry competition offers a $200 prize. The entry fee for the Open Poetry competition will be $10.
For the first time this year, the festival will be having a picture book competition, both open and under 18. The picture book competition will split into two categories, Photographic and graphic. Photography can be straight photos or photoshoped images. The graphic side can be hand created or computer generated images. Prizes for all categories will be $100. Entry for the open section will be $10, and $5 for the under 18 section.
Now entering its 5th year, the Bert van Bedaf award has proved to be a very popular part of the Coal Creek Literary festival with entries coming from all over Australia. Entry forms can be downloaded from the Coal Creek Literary Festival web site or can be picked up from Coal Creek in Korumburra.  Conditions and entry fees are all on the entry form.
Somewhere in your imagination could be a $500 idea if you want to get it down on paper and send it in. Even epic novels start with one word.

 
2014 News

Book launches for young & old

Saturday’s Coal Creek Literary Festival has plenty to offer all tastes in the written word.
It will have workshops, two book launches, numerous activities for both young and old children, a panel discussion, poetry slam, as well as roving bush poets from the Henry Lawson Society.
During the lunch break presentation of the Local Schools’ Picture Book Awards will be made, as well as the announcement of winners of the short story and poetry competitions run in conjunction with the festival.
For those who have the stamina, a separate event in the evening sees the Foster based FAMDA Theatre Company present a short musical comedy, “Open Call.”
Two of the presenters for younger readers will be Jo Hinchliffe and Sarah Billington. Jo has been a teacher, author, and poetry specialist for over 30 years, a special interest being teaching how to make poetry writing easy, creative, and humorous. She’ll be running a session on creating a poetry mandala, while Sarah’s workshop will be aimed at older children.
Sarah Billington is an Australian writer and editor who holds numerous formal qualifications and currently works as a digital editor at Lonely Planet and as a free lance editor for Month9Books.
Anyone who has read local newspapers over recent decades will be familiar with the names of journalists Jane Ross and Richard Schmesszl. Richard has received the rare honor of receiving a Walkley Award while working on a country newspaper, and together with Jane will be presenting a talk entitled “Writing Memoirs or Family History.” Jane is currently writing a memoir about her late mother, from whom she was estranged.
Judith Armstrong, another of the presenters, has managed to make the transition from teaching Russian Literature, to writing works of fiction based on her extensive knowledge in this field. While she has written academic works and book reviews, her latest work of fiction is a must for anyone with an interest in the great Russian writer, Leo Tolstoy. War & Peace and Sonya gives a first person account of what it’s like being married to such a famous person, and is partially based on the author’s translation of Sonya Tolstoy’s diary.
Another of the presenters is Mirboo North resident David Arnault, who gained international recognition last year and award recognition for his 2012 novella, The Koan of the Fisherman’s Wife. His most recent work The 3 Whores of Bertolt Brecht, reflects his long-held interest in history and social justice. His presentation is entitled, “Literature’s cautionary tale: Can it make a difference in the world”
Altogether there is something like 17 presenters running work shops or giving talks.
The Coal Creek Literary Festival is on Saturday, October 5, and runs from 10. a.m. until 5.30 p.m.
For more information on this exciting local event, see www.coalcreekliteraryfestival.

Coal Creek Literary Festival
For a mere gold coin donation, next month’s Coal Creek Literary Festival has plenty to offer all tastes in the written word.
It will have workshops, two book launches, numerous activities for both young and old children, a panel discussion, poetry slam, as well as roving bush poets from the Henry Lawson Society.
During the lunch break presentation of the Local Schools’ Picture Book Awards will be made, as well as the announcement of winners of the short story and poetry competitions run in conjunction with the festival.
For those who have the stamina, a separate event in the evening sees the Foster based FAMDA Theatre Company present a short musical comedy, “Open Call.”
Organizers are fortunate to have the author of The People Smuggler at this year’s festival. It’s an indication of just how much in demand as a public speaker is Robin de Crespigny that her previous appearance before  Coal Creek Literary Festival is to be at the OzAsia Festival in Adelaide.  Her next appearance after the Coal Creek Festival is at the Ubud Writers’ Festival in Bali.
Robin de Crespigny’s multi-award winning, non-fiction work is in an essential work for our time as it turns on its head all of the assumptions we are fed about people smugglers. It’s the story Ali Al Jenabi and his story of survival against incredible odds, and from the torture chambers of Saddam Hussein to the murky world of fake passports and illegal border crossings it is one told with great skill.
Her talk is entitled, “The People Smuggler…what you won’t hear in the news.”
Two of the presenters for younger readers will be Jo Hinchliffe and Sarah Billington. Jo has been a teacher, author, and poetry specialist for over 30 years, a special interest being teaching how to make poetry writing easy, creative, and humorous. She’ll be running a session on creating a poetry mandala, while Sarah’s workshop will be aimed at older children.
Sarah Billington is an Australian writer and editor who holds numerous formal qualifications and currently works as a digital editor at Lonely Planet and as a free lance editor for Month9Books.
Altogether there are something like 17 presenters running work shops or giving talks.
The Coal Creek Literary Festival is on Saturday, October 5, and runs from 10. a.m. until 5.30 p.m.
For more information on this exciting local event, see www.coalcreekliteraryfestival.

Local History at Coal Creek Literary Festival.
Two of the sessions at next month’s Coal Creek Literary Festival are a real treat for anyone interested in local history.
At the Courthouse from 11 am there will be a talk entitled “The Land of the Lyre Bird: The local background.”
Variously described as “one of the most remarkable compilations of settler records,” and one of the “four primary works” on Gippsland writing, this book is easily the best known books on the settler experience in South Gippsland.
It is an indication of its popularity that it has gone through a number of reprints, as well as a new edition when it was last released in 1998.
Both presenters are highly qualified to speak on the subject, and both are previous winners of the Victorian Community History Awards.
Jillian Durance lives at ‘Bonnie Vale,’ the Moyarra property where early settlers met 100 years ago this year to record their stories of pioneer life.
She specializes in the period of the Great War and was the overall winner in the Victorian Community History Awards in 2007 for her work, Still Going Strong: The story of the Moyarra Honor Roll.
As Patrick Morgan points out in Foothill Farmers: The Literature of Gippsland, a number of things make The Land of the Lyre Bird distinctive, if not unique. It was written by the pioneers themselves, and women are included, and as well as this includes examples of poetry of a high standard.
Patrick is the other presenter who will be speaking at the session.
As well as being well known for his pioneering work in writing about Gippsland literature, in 1997 Patrick Morgan published the highly acclaimed The Settling of Gippsland. This work was the winner of the inaugural Victorian Community History Award in 1998.
A rare example of a work giving an overview of Gippsland history, as then Cr. Peter Western wrote in his introduction to the 1997 edition, this book is “an eminently readable account, starting with the story of the of the original Ganai inhabitants and tracing the tribulations, transgressions, failures and successes of European settlers.”
The organisers of this year’s Coal Creek Literary Festival are proud to announce that Patrick Morgan will be releasing a reprint of The Settlement of Gippsland, from 2.15pm at the Coal Creek Gallery.

 

 

6th Coal Creek Literary Festival


The Coal Creek Literary Festival enters its 6th year on Saturday October 5th. The brain child of local journalist Bert van Bedaf, the festival has grown each year. This year’s theme will be “Literature, What is it, and what’s next. There is a strong contingent of presenters, works shops and two book launches for this year’s festival.
Children’s author & illustrator, Spider Lee, will be launching her book The Hair Ball at 10am to start the festival for the younger audience. Other children’s activities will include workshops by author and poet Jo Hinchliffe, as well as writer and editor, Sarah Billington.
Gippsland Historian, Patrick Morgan will also be launching a new finalised version of his book, Settling of Gippsland: A Regional History. The book was first published in 1997 and covers the settlement of the Gippsland region from Aboriginal occupation through to European settlement, squatting, mining, bush ranging and the development of small town communities.
Other presenters for the day include local journalists, Jane Ross and Richard Schmeiszl. Jane has been a journalist with The Star Newspaper for a number of years, while Richard is recently retired from The Sentinel Times. Both have been working on writing family histories.
Crime author Lindy Cameron returns to the festival this year. Lindy is a renowned author of both true crime and crime fiction. She is the creator of Kit O’Malley PI, a character who has appeared in three of her books. She is also the co author of the true crime books, Killer in the Family and Women who Kill. She will be sharing the stage with Vikki Petraitis, author of The Frankston Serial Killer, the story of Paul Denyer. Vikki writes of true crime and controversy, and is about to release her first fiction novel, The Good, the Bad and the Fugly.
The festival will start a 10.00am and will conclude with a panel discussion from 4.15 to 5.30 in the Coal Creek Gallery.
For full details of the days activities and a full list of presenters, visit the Coal Creek Literary Festival web site at www.coalcreekliteraryfestival.com

Coal Creek Literary Festival set for October 5th
The 6th Annual Coal Creek Literary Festival has been set for Saturday, October 5th this year.
Events and presenters for the day are being organized with some already confirmed, and some new aspects to the program being open for discussion.
Writing competitions will again play a major part in the festival, with both poetry and short story competitions being held for Open and Under 18 age groups. This year will see thereturn of Bert van Bedaf award for Short Story. Bert was a major part of getting this festival off the ground in the beginning, the award in his name comes with a prize of $500.  Details and entry forms can be found at the Coal Creek Literary Festival web site,  www.coalcreekliteraryfestival.com
A Children’s picture book  competition will also be held for Primary School Students.
Organizers are hoping for a wide variety of presenters on the day in such varied categories as Children’s books, History, Biography, Future communitations, as well as published local authors.
Other events being discussed for the day include a Poetry Slam, children’s book readings are also in the mix, as well as a panel discussion on communication, past, present and future.
A Gala entertainment evening will see the night out with a local theatre group FAMDA production and music by Psycho Wombat Guitarist, Gavin Van Eede
All money raised from the night will go to local community arts group FAMDA.